New Evidence Suggests Turkey Preparing for Libya-Style Military Intervention in Yemen

Ahmed Abdulkareem
Turkey Yemen Feature Photo

Turkey is sending advisors and weapons into Yemen and flexing its influence in the war-torn country as it seeks to expand its power across the Middle East.

ADEN, YEMEN — As focus begins to turn to developments in Libya and the foreign interference that plagues the Arab country, it seems that Turkey already has its eye elsewhere, preparing for military involvement in Yemen in a move that has sparked concern among Yemenis already struggling against an intervention led by Saudi Arabia, famine and most recently, COVID-19.

Informed sources in Aden and Taiz revealed to MintPress that a militia belonging to the Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated El-Eslah Party, the ideological and political ally of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan, is already engaged in the latest round of fighting in Yemen’s southern provinces, particularly in Abyan and Shabwa.

The Turkish intervention, which extends to Marib – an oil-rich province located 173 kilometers to the northeast of Ansar Allah-controlled Sana’a, has so far been led by officers, experts, and training personnel, and has involved the delivery of weapons, including drones, for use by Turkish allies on the ground. The move paves the way for wider intervention in Yemen that would resemble Turkey’s role in Libya in favor of The Government of National Accord, which is currently battling General Khalifa Haftar’s forces for control over the country.

The Turkish officers and advisors in Yemen are lending comprehensive support to El-Eslah’s militants who have been fighting against the Southern Transitional Council (STC) in Abyan since April 26, when the STC imposed emergency rule in Aden and all southern governorates.

Beginning in 2018 and ‘19, dozens of Turkish officers and experts reportedly arrived in many Yemeni areas overlooking the Red Sea and Arabian Sea, particularly in Shabwa, Abyan, Socotra, al-Mahra and coastal Directorate of Mukha near the Bab al-Mandab Strait as well as to Marib. The officers reportedly entered Yemen as aid workers under pseudonyms using Yemeni passports issued illegally from the Yemeni passport headquarters in the governorates of Ma’rib, Taiz, and Al-Mahrah.

Recently, Ankara trained hundreds of Yemeni fighters in Turkey and in makeshift camps inside of Yemen. Moreover, Turkey recruited Libyan and Syrian mercenaries to fight in Yemen bty promising them high salaries to fight for the Muslim Brotherhood in the southern regions and along the western coast of Yemen, according to sources that spoke to MintPress.

One of those sources said that a group of mercenaries was supposed to enter the country last week in a Turkish plane carrying “aid and medicine related to coronavirus pandemic” but the Saudi-led coalition prevented the plane from landing at Aden’s airport. Now, sources say, Turkish intelligence and its allies in Yemen are working on a strategy to enter the country by pushing for eased travel restrictions under the guise of fighting coronavirus.

Yemeni politicians told MintPress that Turkey wants to reach the strategic port of Balhaf and secure for use as a hub to export gas and oil and to control the open coasts of the Arabian Sea and Bab al-Mandab Strait for later use as a gateway for Turkish intervention in the region. Turkish control in those areas would provide access to support and supply Turkish military bases in Somalia and Qatar.

This information provided to MintPress was confirmed by the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and Libyan Army spokesman Maj. Gen. Ahmed al-Masmari, who is recruiting Syrian and Lybian mercenaries with attractive salaries to fight with the Muslim Brotherhood in Yemen. At this point, both the Saudi-led Coalition and Turkey have exploited the Yemeni poor, recruiting them to fight in both Libya and Syria.

In Taiz, Turkey has opened training camps, the most important of which is located on the outskirts of the al-Hajariya Mountains near the Bab al-Mandab Strait and is run by Hamoud al-Mikhlafi who resides in Turkey and regularly visits Qatar. Al-Mikhlafi also established the “Hamad Camp” in the Jabal Habashi District. Shabwah, and Marib have also received Turkish support.

Ankara has successfully boosted its intelligence presence in Yemen through the use of Turkish humanitarian aid organizations. There are many Turkish “humanitarian relief organizations” operating in three coastal Yemeni regions: Shabwa, Socotra, and the al-Mukha region in Taiz governorate. Among those organizations is the Turkish Humanitarian Relief Agency (IHH) which operates in the governorate of Aden, the Turkish Red Crescent, the Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TIKA), the Turkiye Diyanet Foundation (Türkiye Diyanet Vakfı) among dozens of other Turkish organizations.

Turkey has been supporting Yemen’s El-Eslah Party, founded in 1990, since before the Saudi-led Coalition launched its offensive in Yemen in 2015. Similar to its support for the Government of Accord in Libya, El-Eslah has gained additional momentum in recent years given the power and money it has received from both Turkey and members of the Saudi-led coalition.

An ally in El-Eslah

In a related event, high-ranking government officials from Turkey have traveled to Yemen to develop strategic interests and conclude agreements which could allow Turkey to resort to military force to protect its interests in the country. ln January 2019, Turkey’s deputy interior minister, Ismail Catakln traveled to Aden and held a meeting with high-ranking officials from the El-Eslah party, including Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed, who has been appointed “Prime Minister of Yemen” by ousted President Abdul Mansour al-Hadi on October 18, 2018.

According to a joint official statement, a number of agreements were concluded at the meeting involving humanitarian aid, health and education, economic and service projects, as well as an agreement to activate the joint committee between Yemen and Turkey. The most important agreement was a security and intelligence agreement between the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior Ahmed Al-Misri, a member of El-Eslah party.

This came months after “former Yemeni Transport Minister” Saleh al-Jabwani, a Reform Party affiliate, visited Turkey to sign agreements to hand over Yemeni ports, an agreement that was rejected by “Yemeni government officials” belonging to the Saudi-led coalition.

Prior to that, El-Eslah party officials and ministers have taken trips to Turkey to lobby AKP officials and encourage them to invest in Yemen’s transport sector and ports.

Saudi Coalition reels as Turkey ruffles feathers

It is unlikely that Yemen is currently Turkey’s first priority in the region as it has already established a base in Djibouti and has a presence in both Somalia and Sudan, where Ankara has been granted temporary control of Sudan’s Suakin Island, providing it an important foothold into the Red Sea. But Turkey’s efforts in Yemen not only grant it expanded influence in the Bab al-Mandab Strait and the Red Sea but also with influence in the Arabian Sea.

From the perspective of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, who are already at odds with Turkey, the presence of Turkish forces in Yemen could be a real threat to their interests. Moreover, a Turkish presence could serve as a very effective trump card for Turkey’s close ally Qatar, which has had a hostile relationship with these countries since the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt broke ties with Doha in 2017. Furthermore, Turkey’s efforts, particularly in the Bab al-Mandeb Strait, are a threat to Egyptian national security. Egypt is also at odds with Turkey due to Ankara’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood and competition for resources in the Eastern Mediterranean.

The Turkish project in Yemen has given new zeal to the Saudi-led Coalition in its efforts to control Yemen’s islands. This week, Eritrean forces supported by the United Arab Emirates launched a military attack to take Yemen’s Hanish Islands in the Red Sea on Tuesday. The attack comes amid renewed tensions that have seen Yemenis that attempt to approach the Islands, even fishermen, arrested by Eritrean forces.

The proactive move by Eritrean President Isaias Afwerk is no surprise as Afwerk rejected previous Turkish efforts to establish a presence on the Sudanese island of Suakin. Eritrea briefly occupied the Hanish Islands in 1995 before retreating after the international arbitration court granted Yemen sovereignty over them.

A fiery clash in Yemen between the Saudi-led coalition and Turkey could be inevitable as the coalition seeks to dominate the Yemeni arena and eliminate Turkish interests there. It is also unlikely Turkey will abandon its allies and geostrategic ambitions in Yemen, as it refused to do in Libya or Syria. Unfortunately, the biggest losers in this scenario are the Yemeni people and their lands.

A quagmire for the would-be invader

Yemenis for their part are concerned about potential Turkish military intervention in their country. They say any additional foreign interference will complicate the situation and eliminate the hope of ending the conflict for dozens of years. Indeed, Yemen is already grappling with COVID-19, a collapsed healthcare system, and an ongoing Saudi-led coalition war and blockade.

However, Ansar Allah and its allies, as well as major parties in Yemen allied with the Saudi-led Coalition, have warned that Turkey’s military intervention in the country will be considered blatant aggression ad will be met by fierce military resistance. They urged the Turks to learn from the coalition’s failed experience and their own history which saw the Ottman Turks lose thousands of troops in Yemen during their ancient forays.

Yemeni Hussein al-Qwabari promised an armed struggle against any Turkish involvement in his country. He got upset when asked if he supports conditional Turkish intervention in Yemen. Al-Qwabari wons a home in Mathbah, which translates roughly into “The Alter.” Mathbah is so named for a famous incident in which thousands of Turkish soldiers were massacred by Yemeni resistance forces and al-Qwabari says he is enthusiastically prepared to repeat the experience of his grandparents in their armed struggle against the Turks.

In fact, the issue of Turkish interference in Yemen is a sensitive topics which provokes national fervor, especially among those old enough to remember the painful experiences of previous intrusions. The Ottoman Turkish Empire reduced Yemen, particularly the north, to a poor and backward vassal state.

There is good reason that Yemen has gained a reputation as a quagmire for would-be invaders. Yemen was not only conquered by the Ottomans Turks once but twice. The first time was in the sixteenth century under the pretext of thwarting Portuguese ambitions and saw Ottoman forces unable to capture the whole of Yemen. The Turks sent more than 80,000 soldiers to suppress local uprisings against foreign intervention but only 7,000 Turks returned home. The Turks returned in the nineteenth century and were again expelled in the 1910s.

However, many Yemeni activists belong to El-Eslah, including high-ranking officials in the party as well as journalists, have increased calls to make room for Turkey in Yemen, citing the gains made in Libya by groups supported by Turkey,

“We want Turkish intervention in Yemen,” Anis Mansour, the former Media attaché at the Yemeni embassy in Saudi Arabia said in a video posted from Turkey in which he spoke in front of the infamous Hagia Sophia. Mansour runs a network of social media activists and lives in Qatar. Supporters of Turkish intervention among Yemenis stems from the hope that Turkish military activities could stem Saudi and Emirati ambitions in the country and end the chaos and tragedy left by the coalition. They believe that the Turks can end the war and return the former government to Sana’a. Other Yemenis believe that Turkish intervention will be little more than an alternative to Saudi intervention and will do little to change the situation on the ground.

Yemenis collectively have not forgotten their experiences during both British and Turkish intervention. They are well-acquainted with outside forces that yearn for Yemen for its geographic location more than for its people. Today, they are experiencing another intervention, led by the richest countries in the world. They see neighbors that share a common language and faith do nothing while they are killed by hunger, disease, and incessant bombing.

This has ultimately caused an opening for Turkey as war-weary Yemenis may be amenable to a new foreign invader provided that their rights, sovereignty, and independence are respected.

Feature photo | Fighters of the ‘Shelba’ unit, a militia allied with the U.N.-supported Libyan government, aim at enemy positions at the Salah-addin neighborhood front line in Tripoli, Libya, Aug 31, 2019. Ricard Garcia Vilanova | AP

Ahmed AbdulKareem is a Yemeni journalist. He covers the war in Yemen for MintPress News as well as local Yemeni media.

Ininterrotti crimini di guerra in Yemen dalla criminale coalizione saudita, in un vergognoso silenzio globale

A cura di Enrico Vigna

 

Mentre la coscienza della solidarietà internazionale è attenuata e l’attenzione internazionale langue, sepolta dalla disinformazione o peggio dall’indifferenza, quelle organizzazioni che affermano di essere impegnate per i “diritti umani”, si rivelano estranee o distratte  circa l’eccidio sistematico commesso dalla coalizione americano-saudita e loro complici, contro civili, donne e bambini, sistematicamente e ferocemente da cinque anni, ogni giorno nello Yemen.

 

Dove sono i cantori del “dirittoumanesimo” globale, gli accusatori di “regimi e stati canaglia” indicati da USA e Israele, i praticanti le varie  “rivoluzioni colorate” in ogni dove ci sono  ingiustizie…tranne dove possono infastidire o contrastare interessi NATO o statunitensi?

Perché non levano le loro voci influenti “mediaticamente ed economicamente”, perché tacciono?

Nello Yemen da cinque si attua anni una guerra soprattutto sulla popolazione che vive in prima linea, sottoposta a attacchi indiscriminati che continuano senza sosta, senza alcuna segnale di discontinuità.

Una guerra che ha prodotto finora 3 milioni 650.000 sfollati, continuamente in crescita.

Una aggressione spietata dove non esiste la parola umanitario, dove il cosiddetto diritto internazionale umanitario che dovrebbe proteggere i civili, all’interno di un conflitto è quotidianamente calpestato nel silenzio, letale, internazionale.

 

 

 

Secondo molti testimoni e denunce, la coalizione saudita utilizza armamenti USA, prodotti e forniti dalla società Gazal Dynamics, che è fornitrice del sistema aeronautico americano, il quale ha in dotazione  bombe e missili come l’Mk 82, un missile a caduta libera leggera.

La coalizione guidata da Arabia Saudita e Stati Uniti non rispetta i minimi obblighi ai sensi delle leggi di guerra, e utilizza l’armamento statunitense in attacchi palesemente sproporzionati e indiscriminati, che provocano migliaia di vittime civili e danni a strutture civili nel paese arabo.

Dal marzo 2015, la coalizione saudita, ha iniziato questa guerra contro lo Yemen con l’obiettivo dichiarato di schiacciare il movimento Houthi di Ansarullah, che aveva preso il potere e cacciato il fedele alleato di Riyadh, l’ex presidente fuggitivo Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi.

Ininterrotti crimini di guerra in Yemen dalla criminale coalizione saudita, in un vergognoso silenzio globale      
Anche secondo il quotidiano La Repubblica: “… Nello Yemen, negli ultimi mesi la crisi umanitaria si è ulteriormente aggravata, restando il punto del mondo dove si sta consumando la tragedia peggiore degli ultimi trent’anni. Un conflitto che, così come è avvenuto in Siria, colpisce soprattutto la popolazione civile, fin dall’inizio della guerra. Dallo scorso dicembre, infatti, nella sostanziale indifferenza della cosiddetta “comunità internazionale” e della maggior parte del sistema mediatico, qualcuno si è messo a calcolare che, di fatto, tre civili ogni giorno vengono uccisi, in media una vittima ogni 8 ore. ..Tre anni e oltre 600.000 persone yemenite morte e ferite, impedendo ai pazienti di recarsi all’estero per cure e bloccando l’ingresso delle medicine nel paese dilaniato dalla guerra…”.

Dopo gli innumerevoli bombardamenti sulle infrastrutture civili e gli ospedali, oggi sono oltre 2.400 i morti di colera e la crisi ha innescato quello che le Nazioni Unite hanno descritto come il peggior disastro umanitario del mondo.

Gli abitanti della provincia di Hodeidah hanno organizzato manifestazioni di protesta per le aggressioni criminali nel loro territorio contro la popolazione.
Una manifestazione di protesta è stata organizzata dagli  abitanti della provincia di Hodeidah per condannare l’ultimo crimine commesso dagli attacchi aerei sauditi contro i prigionieri nella provincia di Dhamar.
I partecipanti hanno lanciato slogan ed esposto  striscioni per denunciare i crimini del terribile massacro, che ha lasciato decine di prigionieri morti e feriti, che erano elencati nell’accordo di scambio firmato a Stoccolma.

La popolazione ha urlato il suo sdegno e ritiene le Nazioni Unite e la comunità internazionale pienamente responsabili degli atroci crimini commessi dall’aggressione contro il popolo yemenita.
Il 1° settembre l’aggressione aerea di USA-Arabia Saudita aveva lanciato sette incursioni su un edificio utilizzato per prigionieri di guerra a nord della provincia di Dhamar. Più di 150 persone sono state uccise e ferite nel massacro, mentre ancora continua il processo di recupero dei corpi delle vittime.      3 settembre 2019

 

A cura di Enrico Vigna, CIVG

Preso da: https://www.lantidiplomatico.it/dettnews-ininterrotti_crimini_di_guerra_in_yemen_dalla_criminale_coalizione_saudita_in_un_vergognoso_silenzio_globale/24790_30674/

From Cluster Bombs to Toxic Waste: Saudi Arabia is Creating the Next Fallujah in Yemen

Ahmed Abdulkareem
Yemen Toxic Legacy Feature photoAL-JAWF, YEMEN — As the world’s focus turns to the rapidly-spreading COVID-19 pandemic, Yemenis are reeling from their own brewing tragedy, contending with the thousands of cluster bombs, landmines and other exploded munitions that now litter their homeland. Just yesterday, a young child was killed and another was injured in the al-Ghail district of al-Jawf when a landmine left by the Saudi military exploded, witnesses told MintPress. Outraged and terrified by the presence of these unexploded ordnances, Ahmed Sharif, a father of 9 who owns a farm in the district called the unexploded ordnances “a significant threat to our children.”

Earlier this week, thousands of cluster bombs containing between dozens and hundreds of smaller submunitions were dropped by air and scattered indiscriminately over large areas near Ahmed’s farm. A large number of those munitions failed to explode on impact, creating a new threat to residents already reeling from 5 years of war, famine and an economic blockade. The use, production, sale, and transfer of cluster munitions is prohibited under the 2008 Convention on Cluster Munitions, an international agreement recognized by over 100 countries, but rejected by Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Saudi Arabia is estimated to have dropped thousands of tons of U.S.-made weapons in al-Jawf over the past 100 days alone. Al-Jawf is an oil-rich province that lies in Yemen’s north-central reaches along the Saudi border. The aerial campaign is likely a last-ditch effort to stem the tide of battlefield success by local volunteer fighters who teamed with Houthi forces to recapture large swaths of al-Jawf and Marib provinces. That campaign, for all intents and purposes, has failed.

Yemen UXO

An unexploded bomb dropped by a Saudi warplane is recovered from a pomegranate farm in the Jamilah district in Sadaa. Courtesy | YEMAC

On Wednesday, the Houthis announced that their military operation – dubbed “God Overpowered Them” – was complete and that al-Jawf was free of Saudi occupation. According to Houthi sources, more than 1,200 Saudi-led coalition fighters were killed or injured during the operation and dozens of Saudi troops, including officers, were captured. The Houthis also struck deep into Saudi territory in retaliation for the more than 250 Saudi airstrikes that were carried out during the campaign. In multiple operations, ballistic missiles and drones were used to target facilities inside Saudi Arabia, according to officials.

Saudi losses haven’t been limited to al-Jawf either. Last week, Marib province, which lies adjacent to Yemen’s capital of Sana’a, was recaptured following heavy battles with Saudi forces. Local tribal fighters were able to clear strategic areas in the Sirwah District with the assistance of Houthi forces and take control of the town of Tabab Al-Bara and the strategic Tala Hamra hills that overlook Marib city. Both the Saudi-led coalition and its allied militants initially admitted defeat but later described their loss as a tactic withdrawal.

Marib is now the second Yemeni governorate adjacent to Saudi Arabia to fall under the control by Yemen’s resistance forces in the last month, al-Jawf being the first. Both provinces have strategic importance to Saudi Arabia and could serve as a potential launch point for operations into Saudi Arabia’s Najran province.

“Saudi [Arabia] and America have planted our land with death”

The highly populated urban areas of Sana’a, Sadaa, Hodeida, Hajjah, Marib, and al-Jawf have been subjected to incomprehensible bombing campaigns during the Saudi-led war on Yemen, which turns five on March 26. The sheer scale of that campaign, which often sees hundreds of separate airstrikes carried out every day, coupled with its indiscriminate nature, has left Yemen one of the most heavily contaminated countries in the world.

Since 2015, when the war began, coalition warplanes have conducted more than 250,000 airstrikes in Yemen, according to the Yemeni Army. 70 percent of those airstrikes have hit civilian targets. Thousands of tons of weapons, most often supplied by the United States, have been dropped on hospitals, schools, markets, mosques, farms, factories, bridges, and power and water treatment plants and have left unexploded ordnances scattered across densely populated areas.

A significant proportion of those ordnances are still embedded in the ground or amid the rubble of bombed-out buildings, posing a threat to both civilians and the environment. As Man’e Abu Rasein, a father who lost two sons to an unexploded cluster bomb in August of 2018 puts it: “Saudi [Arabia] and America have planted our land with death.” Abu Rasein’s sons, Rashid, ten, and Hussein, eight, were grazing their family’s herd of sheep in the village of al-Ghol north of Sadaa, far from any battlefield. They spotted an unusual looking object and like most curious young boys, picked it up to investigate. But the object they found was no toy, it was an unexploded cluster munition dropped by a Saudi jet. After hearing an explosion, the boys’ family went to investigate and found them lying dead, covered in blood.

Yemen UXO

A group of children in Sahar district inspects a cluster bomb dropped by a Saudi warplane at a farm in Sadaa, March 18, 2019. Abdullah Azzi | MintPress News

Since March of 2015, Human Rights Watch has recorded more than 15 incidents involving six different types of cluster munitions in at least five of Yemen’s 21 governorates. According to the United Nations Development Program’s Emergency Mine Action Project, some of the heaviest mine and ERW (explosive remnants of war) contamination is reported in northern governorates bordering Saudi Arabia, southern coastal governorates and west-central governorates, all areas surrounding Houthi-dominated regions of Yemen. Since 2018 alone, the UNDP has cleared nearly 9,000 landmines and over 116,000 explosive remnants in Yemen.

From the Yemeni war of 1994 to the six wars in Sadaa, Yemenis have suffered several wars over the last three decades. Yet thanks to saturation of U.S. weapons, the ongoing war has brought death on a toll not seen in Yemen for hundreds of years. In Sadaa, the Saudi coalition has a significant legacy of unexploded ordinances, up to one million according to figures provided to MintPress by the Yemeni Executive Mine Action Center (YEMAC), an organization backed by the United Nations.

The Project Manager of YEMAC identified heavy cluster munition contamination in Saada, al-Jawf, Amran, Hodeida, Mawit, and Sanaa governorates, including in Sanaa city. Contamination was also reported in Marib. For the time being, YEMAC is the only organization working throughout the country during the ongoing war. Their teams are confronted with a very complex situation, disposing of both conventional munitions and bombs dropped from airplanes, including explosive remnants of war rockets, artillery shells, mortars, bombs, hand grenades, landmines, cluster bombs, and other sub-munitions and similar explosives.

Saudi Arabia’s toxic legacy

In addition to killing and injuring hundreds of civilians, American-made weapons have exposed Yemen’s people to highly toxic substances on a level not seen since the now-infamous use of radioactive depleted uranium by the United States in Fallujah, Iraq, which to this day is causing abnormally high rates of cancer and birth defects.

The hazardous chemicals from Saudi Coalition military waste, including radioactive materials, fuel hydrocarbons, and heavy metals, has already led to outbreaks of disease. Vehicles abandoned on battlefields, usually in various states of destruction, contain toxic substances including PCBs, CFCs, DU residue, heavy metals, unexploded ordnances, asbestos and mineral oils. Hundreds of these military scraps remain publicly accessible in Nihm, al-Jawf, Serwah, Marib and throughout Yemen.

Aside from the threat they pose to life and limb, unexploded ordnances contain toxic substances like RDX, TNT, and heavy metals which release significant levels of toxic substances into the air, soil and water. According to both the Ministry of Water and Environment and the Ministry of Health, which have undertaken environmental assessments on the impact of urban bombing, high levels of hazardous waste and air pollutants are already present in a populated areas

Yemen UXO

A young girl injured by a cluster bomb dropped by a Saudi warplane is fitted for a wheelchair near the Yemen-Saudi border, March 18, 2020. Photo | YEMAC

Alongside the still unknown quantities of more conventional weapons remnants in Yemen, the waste from the cleanup of bombed-out buildings has been found to be especially contaminated with hazardous materials, including asbestos which is used in military applications for sound insulation, fireproofing and wiring among other things. Fires and heavy smoke billowing over heavily populated civilian areas following Saudi bombing runs also pose an imminent threat to human health. A common sight in many Yemeni cities since the war began, these thick clouds of toxic smoke sometimes linger for days and coat both surfaces and people’s lungs with hazardous toxins like PAHs, dioxins and furans, materials which have been shown to cause cancer, liver problems and birth defects.

Before the war began, most hazardous materials were trucked to Sanaa where they were separated and disposed of properly at the sprawling al-Azragein treatment plant south of the capital. But that plant was among the first targets destroyed by Saudi airstrikes after the war began. After it was bombed, puddles and heaps of toxic material were left to mix with rainwater and seep into surrounding areas. Yemeni researchers are still trying to grasp the scale of pollution from biohazardous chemicals at the site.

Although a comprehensive nationwide environmental assessment of the impact of urban bombing in Yemen has yet to be completed, high levels of hazardous waste and air pollutants have been recorded by many hospitals and environmental agencies. Some idea of the long-term effects can also be gleaned from studies carried out in areas where similar toxins have been used, particularly by the United States in Fallujah, Iraq and in Vietnam, where scientific assessments have shown increased cases of birth defects, cancer and other diseases, including in U.S. veterans.

In southern Yemen, where Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates operate largely unchallenged, the coalition has been disposing of military waste in large trenches devoid of any measures to mitigate potential toxic fallout.  Waste is dumped into large holes and either detonated or simply buried, inevitably contaminating soil and groundwater according to data from the UN Environment Program.

Yemen’s coastline hasn’t been immune either. The country’s General Authority for Environmental Protection said Wednesday that the Saudi-led coalition is dumping toxic and polluted waste on the shores of Yemen and in Yemeni regional waters, causing great damage to the marine environment, the deaths of fish and marine organisms, and in some cases, actually changing the color of the sea to a toxic green. The agency stated that in addition to dumping toxic waste, the coalition was allowing unsafe fishing practices such as marine dredging and the use of explosives by foreign ships, destroying the marine environment and coral reefs.

One hundred years to safety

Thousands of displaced Yemenis cannot fathom returning home due to the large number of explosives potentially hidden in and around their houses. Removing them all would require an end to the U.S.-backed war and economic blockade. Special equipment and armored machines such as armored excavators would need to be brought in, a slim prospect in a country unable to secure even the basic stapes of life.

Yemen EXO

The remnants of a cluster bomb dropped by Saudi-led coalition warplanes inside a Yemeni home. March 18, 2020. Abdullah Azzi| MintPress News

Explosive remnants do not just impact lives and limbs, they prevent the use of potentially productive agricultural land and the rebuilding of important infrastructure. Like many border areas in Saada and Hajjah, fertile soil in al-Jawf and Marib has become so environmentally polluted since the war began that it could take decades to recover. Explosive remnants also prevent access to vital resources like water and firewood, cripples the movement of residents, including children traveling to school, and prevents aid from reaching those in need.

Even if the Saudi-led coalition were to stop the war immediately and lift the blockade, its legacy of indiscriminate bombing on such a massive scale will be felt for years to come. Due to the intensity of the bombing, experts at the United Nations Development Program’s Yemeni Executive Mine Action Center estimate that clearance could take at least 100 years in larger cities. Despite these dangers, desperate families with nowhere to go do not waste a lull in the barrage of Saudi airstrikes or a short-lived ceasefire to attempt to return home.

Feature photo | A collection of unexploded ordnance recovered by the UNDP’s YEMAC project in Yemen. Courtesy | YEMAC

Ahmed AbdulKareem is a Yemeni journalist. He covers the war in Yemen for MintPress News as well as local Yemeni media.

Ininterrotti crimini di guerra vengono commessi in Yemen dalla criminale coalizione saudita, in un vergognoso silenzio globale

Scritto da Enrico Vigna

Mentre la coscienza della solidarietà internazionale è attenuata e l’attenzione internazionale langue, sepolta dalla disinformazione o peggio dall’indifferenza, quelle organizzazioni che affermano di essere impegnate per i “diritti umani”, si rivelano estranee o distratte  circa l’eccidio sistematico commesso dalla coalizione americano-saudita e loro complici, contro civili, donne e bambini, sistematicamente e ferocemente da cinque anni, ogni giorno nello Yemen.

https://www.yemenpress.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/lvl2k20170927084637-696x392.jpg

Dove sono i cantori del “dirittoumanesimo” globale, gli accusatori di “regimi e stati canaglia” indicati da USA e Israele, i praticanti le varie  “rivoluzioni colorate” in ogni dove ci sono  ingiustizie…tranne dove possono infastidire o contrastare interessi NATO o statunitensi?

Perché non levano le loro voci influenti “mediaticamente ed economicamente”, perché tacciono?

Nello Yemen da cinque si attua anni una guerra soprattutto sulla popolazione che vive in prima linea, sottoposta a attacchi indiscriminati che continuano senza sosta, senza alcuna segnale di discontinuità.

Una guerra che ha prodotto finora 3 milioni 650.000 sfollati, continuamente in crescita.
Una aggressione spietata dove non esiste la parola umanitario, dove il cosiddetto diritto internazionale umanitario che dovrebbe proteggere i civili, all’interno di un conflitto è quotidianamente calpestato nel silenzio, letale, internazionale.

 

Secondo molti testimoni e denunce, la coalizione saudita utilizza armamenti USA, prodotti e forniti dalla società Gazal Dynamics, che è fornitrice del sistema aeronautico americano, il quale ha in dotazione  bombe e missili come l’Mk 82, un missile a caduta libera leggera.

La coalizione guidata da Arabia Saudita e Stati Uniti non rispetta i minimi obblighi ai sensi delle leggi di guerra, e utilizza l’armamento statunitense in attacchi palesemente sproporzionati e indiscriminati, che provocano migliaia di vittime civili e danni a strutture civili nel paese arabo.
Dal marzo 2015, la coalizione saudita, ha iniziato questa guerra contro lo Yemen con l’obiettivo dichiarato di schiacciare il movimento Houthi di Ansarullah, che aveva preso il potere e cacciato il fedele alleato di Riyadh, l’ex presidente fuggitivo Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi.

Anche secondo il quotidiano La Repubblica: “… Nello Yemen, negli ultimi mesi la crisi umanitaria si è ulteriormente aggravata, restando il punto del mondo dove si sta consumando la tragedia peggiore degli ultimi trent’anni. Un conflitto che, così come è avvenuto in Siria, colpisce soprattutto la popolazione civile, fin dall’inizio della guerra. Dallo scorso dicembre, infatti, nella sostanziale indifferenza della cosiddetta “comunità internazionale” e della maggior parte del sistema mediatico, qualcuno si è messo a calcolare che, di fatto, tre civili ogni giorno vengono uccisi, in media una vittima ogni 8 ore. ..Tre anni e oltre 600.000 persone yemenite morte e ferite, impedendo ai pazienti di recarsi all’estero per cure e bloccando l’ingresso delle medicine nel paese dilaniato dalla guerra…”.
Dopo gli innumerevoli bombardamenti sulle infrastrutture civili e gli ospedali, oggi sono oltre 2.400 i morti di colera e la crisi ha innescato quello che le Nazioni Unite hanno descritto come il peggior disastro umanitario del mondo.

Risultati immagini per yemen guerra

Gli abitanti della provincia di Hodeidah hanno organizzato manifestazioni di protesta per le aggressioni criminali nel loro territorio contro la popolazione  

 

 

Una manifestazione di protesta è stata organizzata dagli  abitanti della provincia di Hodeidah per condannare l’ultimo crimine commesso dagli attacchi aerei sauditi contro i prigionieri nella provincia di Dhamar.
I partecipanti hanno lanciato slogan ed esposto  striscioni per denunciare i crimini del terribile massacro, che ha lasciato decine di prigionieri morti e feriti, che erano elencati nell’accordo di scambio firmato a Stoccolma.

La popolazione ha urlato il suo sdegno e ritiene le Nazioni Unite e la comunità internazionale pienamente responsabili degli atroci crimini commessi dall’aggressione contro il popolo yemenita.
Il 1° settembre l’aggressione aerea di USA-Arabia Saudita aveva lanciato sette incursioni su un edificio utilizzato per prigionieri di guerra a nord della provincia di Dhamar. Più di 150 persone sono state uccise e ferite nel massacro, mentre ancora continua il processo di recupero dei corpi delle vittime.      3 settembre 2019

A cura di Enrico Vigna, CIVG

Preso da:  http://www.civg.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1600:ininterrotti-crimini-di-guerra-vengono-commessi-in-yemen-dalla-criminale-coalizione-saudita-in-un-vergognoso-silenzio-globale&catid=2:non-categorizzato&Itemid=101

Yemen: La strage degli innocenti

Più di 2700 i bambini morti dall’inizio del conflitto.

di Gianluca Vivacqua –
È ormai quasi un lustro che una feroce guerra civile divampa nello Yemen. Il 19 marzo scorso del conflitto tra Houthi e coalizione pro-Hadi a guida saudita è stato festeggiato il quarto anniversario di sangue, ma non era la notizia principale di quel giorno: i media hanno preferito dare maggiore spazio alla vicenda di una massaggiatrice cinese vicina al presidente Trump, Cindy Yang, o al fatto che in Italia la Camera ha approvato la mozione della maggioranza sul memorandum d’intesa con la Cina, per l’adesione alla via della Seta.
Sembra che il destino di questa guerra tanto violenta quanto remota sia ormai sempre più simile a quello del conflitto in Siria, in corso dal 2011.
Alla contrapposizione in armi tra assadiani e anti-assadiani manca poco per eguagliare il record della decennale guerra tra Iraq e Iran, ma è un altro aspetto a cui non si dà la dovuta attenzione: il comune denominatore tra i fatti bellici dello Yemen e quelli siriani, quasi a formare un ideale triangolo con quelli iranian-iracheni, sta in una particolare percezione della comunità internazionale, per cui si tende progressivamente ad operare un’eclissi di informazione su uno scenario che viene considerato o acquisito come permanente. Salvo tornare a parlarne in presenza di sviluppi eclatanti o dati che fanno discutere.
È toccato all’Onu squarciare nuovamente il sipario sullo Yemen, con i numeri relativi ai “caduti” di guerra minorenni. Secondo le stime del Palazzo di Vetro, sono più di 2.770 i bambini uccisi dall’inizio del conflitto. Quasi la metà di essi (47%) risultano periti nel corso dei ripetuti bombardamenti aerei che la coalizione a guida saudita (sostenuta dagli Usa) ha condotto dal 2015 in poi su Sana’a, la capitale in mano agli Houthi da quattro anni, e sulla regione circostante. Più in generale già l’Alto commissariato Onu per i Diritti umani aveva osservato come la sola coalizione comandata da Riad, con i suoi attacchi e le sue incursioni aeree, avesse causato il doppio delle vittime tra la popolazione civile rispetto al resto delle forze in campo.
Tornando alla conta dei martiri involontari di età prescolare e scolare, ancora più consistente è la cifra, 4.730, relativa ai feriti. Sommando piccoli morti e piccoli feriti dunque si arriva a superare le 7mila unità, una fetta abbastanza consistente delle 16mila vittime civili che in totale la guerra (sempre secondo le stime delle Nazioni Unite) avrebbe provocato.
Integra i dati Onu l’impietosa media quotidiana stilata da Save the Children: la Ong calcola che a partire dal 13 dicembre 2018, cioè dalla firma dell’ accordo di Stoccolma, nel Paese ogni giorno si continua a combattere ad un ritmo di otto minori uccisi o gravemente feriti. Il che significa che l’accordo di pace svedese, a parte il cesste-il-fuoco per Hodeida e l’ingresso degli aiuti umanitari nel suo porto, ha generato pochi altri effetti degni di nota.

Preso da: https://www.notiziegeopolitiche.net/yemen-la-strage-degli-innocenti/

ONU: l’aggressione saudita allo Yemen causerà 500.000 morti entro il 2020

Le Nazioni Unite avvertono che il bilancio delle vittime a causa dell’aggressione dell’Arabia Saudita allo Yemen potrebbe salire a 500.000 nel 2020.

ONU: l'aggressione saudita allo Yemen causerà 500.000 morti entro il 2020
“Se i combattimenti continuano fino al 2022, possiamo aspettarci un totale quasi mezzo milione di morti, tra cui più di 300.000 persone che moriranno di fame, mancanza di assistenza medica e cause correlate”, è l’allarme lanciato dal vice segretario generale della Onu per gli affari umanitari, Mark Lowcock.

Citando le previsioni di questa guerra, determinata dall’Università di Denver su richiesta del Programma delle Nazioni Unite per lo sviluppo (UNDP), Lowcock ha sottolineato che, se l’Arabia Saudita e i suoi alleati pongono fine quest’anno alla sua campagna di aggressione contro lo Yemen il numero di morti sarà due volte inferiore.

Inoltre, il funzionario delle Nazioni Unite ha menzionato i problemi di finanziamento che devono affrontare le operazioni umanitarie nello Yemen.

 

 

12 milioni di bambine nel mondo costrette al matrimonio

Quando Gabriella Gillespie aveva 6 anni, suo padre uccise sua madre. Quando di anni ne aveva 13, il padre portò lei e le sorelle a vivere nel proprio paese d’origine, lo Yemen, dove le figlie furono vendute in matrimonio.

Disperata alla prospettiva di sposare l’uomo di oltre 60 anni a cui era stata promessa, la sorella di Gabriella, la diciassettenne Issy, indossò l’abito nuziale e si gettò dal tetto. Issy precipitò verso la morte, mentre gli ospiti ignari continuavano a festeggiare.
Come riportato dall’Independent, le sorelle rimaste, che non parlavano una parola d’arabo, si rassegnarono a vivere in un remoto villaggio di montagna – tutt’altra cosa rispetto alle comodità dell’era moderna, in abitazioni di fango prive di elettricità.

Nelle comunità rurali, le bambine sono date in sposa già a partire dall’età di otto anni; alcune muoiono durante la prima notte di nozze, mentre altre subiscono orribili lacerazioni. La consumazione avviene su un trono avvolto da stoffa bianca, dopodiché la famiglia espone il tessuto insanguinato come fosse un trofeo. La giovane sa bene quale destino la attende se non dovesse sanguinare – sarà restituita alla propria famiglia e verrà assassinata, sulla base della convinzione che non fosse vergine.
Dopo anni di matrimonio costellati di abusi fisici, sessuali, emotivi e psicologici, Gabriella è riuscita infine a fuggire nel Regno Unito insieme ai suoi cinque figli.
Macabre vicende di questo tipo non sono riservate a chi proviene da paesi in via di sviluppo. Gabriella è nata in Gran Bretagna – come la propria madre, una donna inglese. E secondo le stime dell’organizzazione Unchained At Last, nei soli Stati Uniti più di duecentomila minorenni sono state coinvolte in matrimoni legali, fra il 2000 e il 2015. La straziante realtà è che ogni anno, nel mondo, 12 milioni di bambine vengono date in sposa, il che significa che ciò accade a una bambina ogni due secondi.
Rachel Yates, che attualmente ricopre il ruolo di direttore esecutivo presso Girls not Brides, l’impresa globale per porre fine al fenomeno dei matrimoni con minorenni, ha dichiarato:
“Si verificano casi di spose bambine in ogni parte del mondo, dal Medio Oriente all’America latina, dall’Asia meridionale all’Europa. Alla base del matrimonio contratto con minorenni vi sono le disuguaglianze di genere, e la convinzione che le bambine e le donne siano in qualche modo inferiori ai ragazzi e agli uomini. La povertà, la mancanza d’istruzione, le tradizioni culturali e l’incertezza alimentano e sostengono questa pratica.
“Queste ragazze non sono pronte, né fisicamente né emotivamente, a diventare mogli e madri. Di solito subiscono un’enorme pressione perché si riproducano prima che i loro corpi possano sopportarlo, e perché i figli siano numerosi. Il rischio che si presentino gravi complicazioni durante la gravidanza e il parto è più alto, come lo è quello di contrarre l’HIV o l’AIDS e di essere vittime di violenza domestica.
“Ma questa pratica non è dannosa solo per le bambine. Gli studi dimostrano che il fenomeno sta costando al mondo miliardi e miliardi di dollari. Se poniamo fine ai matrimoni con minorenni, allora le bambine, le loro famiglie, le comunità e le nazioni stesse godranno, nel complesso, di maggiori disponibilità economiche e di un migliore stile di vita.”
“Caroline” dal Kenya ha raccontato a Equality Now, un’organizzazione no-profit dedita all’affermazione dei diritti umani di donne e bambine, che aveva solo sette anni quando la madre decise di farla circoncidere, per prepararla alle nozze. L’esperienza, impossibile da dimenticare, si rivelò brutale, dolorosa e traumatica.
Poco dopo, Caroline scoprì che la madre aveva intenzione di farle sposare un uomo la cui età oscillava fra i 50 e i 60 anni. Un giorno, prima dell’alba, è scappata di casa per rifugiarsi in un centro della Tasaru Ntomonok Initiative (nell’ambito delle attività di Girls Not Brides in Kenya), dove le è stata data l’opportunità di iniziare a rifarsi una vita e di riprendere a frequentare la scuola.
“Innanzitutto, ci sono le situazioni in cui le famiglie delle bambine prendono accordi con altre famiglie per organizzare il matrimonio con un ragazzo o un uomo,” ha spiegato Jean-Paul Murunga, funzionario di progetto presso Equality Now.
“A seguire ci sono i casi in cui l’età della sposa si definisce su base religiosa. Nell‘Islam, per esempio, i testi sacri stabiliscono che una giovane debba sposarsi una volta raggiunta la pubertà. Trattandosi di un termine ambiguo, l’Islam non dà una definizione precisa dell’età anagrafica corrispondente. In paesi come il Sudan, dove la legge vigente è la Sharia, le bambine vengono date in sposa fra i 10 e i 12 anni.
“Si registrano, inoltre, molti casi di spose minorenni all’interno delle società patriarcali. Le ragazze sono viste come soggetti subordinati e devono conformarsi alle prescrizioni degli uomini. Molto spesso accade che contraggano matrimonio fra i 16 e i 18 anni, perché il consenso alle nozze è stato fornito dai loro genitori o tutori.
“Un altro fattore importante è la povertà. Le famiglie povere possono migliorare la propria situazione finanziaria facendo sposare la figlia. Più la ragazza è giovane, ed essendo vergine, più è considerata pura e pertanto la dote sarà più sostanziosa. Alle famiglie interessa dare via le figlie prima della pubertà per il timore che, superata quell’età, ci siano buone probabilità che diventino sessualmente attive, che rovinino il nome della famiglia, o che si abbassi il prezzo della dote.
“E l’ultimo scenario è quello che si verifica nei paesi teatro di conflitti politici, dove gli individui sono spesso dislocati. Le famiglie consegnano le figlie ad altre famiglie più ricche, sperando che così godano di maggiore sicurezza e agio. Ma la realtà è che le bambine si ritrovano intrappolate in reti di violenze, abusi sessuali e matrimoni con minorenni.”
Quello delle spose bambine è un problema complesso, per cui non esiste una soluzione ottimale. Gli esperti ritengono che l’istruzione abbia un ruolo fondamentale – non solo dal punto di vista accademico, ma anche rispetto alla comunità estesa di quanti risultano maggiormente colpiti dal fenomeno.
All’inizio di quest’anno l’UNICEF ha pubblicato un rapporto in cui si registravano lievi diminuzioni nella casistica globale dei matrimoni contratti con minorenni. Tuttavia, a meno di non affrontare con misure adeguate le questioni legate alle norme sociali e alla disuguaglianza di genere, a queste bambine continuerà ad essere negata l’esistenza emancipata, propria del ventunesimo secolo, che spetta loro di diritto.
Traduzione di Maria Luisa Grasso

Preso da: https://it.insideover.com/donne/12-milioni-di-bambine-nel-mondo-costrette-al-matrimonio.html

Giornata dell’acqua, “nei paesi in guerra uccide come proiettili”

Nuovo rapporto dell’Unicef in occasione della giornata mondiale. Nei paesi colpiti da conflitti protratti nel tempo, i bambini sotto i 15 anni hanno probabilità 3 volte maggiori di morire a causa della mancanza di acqua sicura e servizi igienico-sanitari che per violenza

22 marzo 2019

Foto: Unicef/Water Under Fire
Unicef/Water Under Fire

Roma – Secondo un nuovo rapporto dell’Unicef, lanciato oggi, in occasione della Giornata Mondiale dell’acqua, i bambini sotto i 15 anni nei paesi colpiti da conflitti protratti nel tempo, in media, hanno probabilita’ 3 maggiori di morire a causa di malattie diarroiche dovute alla mancanza di acqua sicura e servizi igienico-sanitari che per violenza diretta. Il rapporto “Acqua sotto attacco” (Water Under Fire) mostra i tassi di mortalita’ in 16 paesi durante conflitti prolungati e mostra che, nella maggior parte, i bambini sotto i 5 anni hanno probabilita’ 20 volte maggiori di morire per malattie legate alla diarrea dovuta alla mancanza di accesso all’acqua e ai servizi igienico-sanitari sicuri che per violenza diretta.

“Le probabilita’ gia’ sono contro i bambini che vivono conflitti prolungati – molti di loro non possono raggiungere fonti di acqua sicura,” ha dichiarato Henrietta Fore, Direttore generale Unicef. “La realta’ e’ che ci sono piu’ bambini che muoiono per la mancanza di accesso ad acqua sicura che per proiettili”. Senza acqua, i bambini semplicemente non -possono sopravvivere. Secondo gli ultimi dati, nel mondo 2,1 miliardi di persone non hanno accesso ad acqua sicura e 4,5 miliardi di persone non usano servizi igienico-sanitari sicuri.

Senza acqua sicura e servizi igienico sanitari efficaci, i bambini sono a rischio di malnutrizione e malattie prevenibili che comprendono anche diarrea, tifo, colera e polio. Le ragazze sono particolarmente colpite: sono vulnerabili a violenza sessuale mentre raccolgono acqua o si apprestano ad utilizzare le latrine. Devono fare i conti con la loro dignita’ mentre si lavano e curano l’igiene mestruale. Non vanno a scuola durante il periodo mestruale se le scuole non hanno acqua e strutture igieniche adatte. Queste minacce sono acuite durante i conflitti quando attacchi indiscriminati distruggono infrastrutture, feriscono personale e tagliano l’energia che consente di ricevere acqua e utilizzare i sistemi igienico sanitari. I conflitti armati limitano anche l’accesso alle attrezzature di riparazione essenziali e ai materiali di consumo come carburante o cloro – che possono essere esauriti, razionati, dirottati o bloccati alla distribuzione. Fin troppo spesso i servizi essenziali vengono deliberatamente negati.
“Attacchi deliberati su strutture idriche e igienico sanitarie sono attacchi contro bambini vulnerabili,” ha dichiarato Fore. “L’acqua e’ un diritto di base. È una necessita’ per la vita”. L’Unicef lavora nei paesi in conflitto per fornire acqua sicura da bere e servizi igienico-sanitari adeguati migliorando e riparando i sistemi idrici, trasportando acqua, costruendo latrine e promuovendo informazioni sulle pratiche igieniche. L’Unicef chiede ai governi e ai partner di: fermare gli attacchi contro infrastrutture idriche e igienico-sanitarie e personale; collegare la risposta salva vita umanitaria a uno sviluppo del sistema idrico e sanitario sostenibile per tutti; rinforzare la capacita’ dei governi e delle agenzie di fornire consistentemente servizi idrici e igienico sanitari di alta qualita’ durante le emergenze.
Il rapporto ha calcolato i tassi di mortalita’ in 16 paesi con conflitti prolungati: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Camerun, Repubblica Centrafricana, Ciad, Repubblica Democratica del Congo, Etiopia, Iraq, Libia, Mali, Myanmar, Somalia, Sud Sudan, Sudan, Siria e Yemen. In tutti questi paesi, ad eccezione di Libia, Iraq e Siria, i bambini di 15 anni e piu’ giovani hanno piu’ probabilita’ di morire per malattie legate all’acqua rispetto che a causa di violenze collettive. Eccetto in Siria e Libia, i bambini sotto i 5 anni hanno possibilita’ 20 volte maggiori di morire per malattie diarroiche legate ad acqua e servizi igienico sanitari non sicuri rispetto che a violenze collettive. (DIRE)

Preso da: http://www.redattoresociale.it/Notiziario/Articolo/627715/Giornata-dell-acqua-nei-paesi-in-guerra-uccide-come-proiettili

Aggressione camuffata da guerre civili

 

 JPEG - 38.6 Kb

 

Se ci si darà la pena di guardare con distacco i fatti, si constaterà che i vari conflitti che da sedici anni insanguinano l’intero Medio Oriente Allargato, dall’Afghanistan alla Libia, non sono una successione di guerre civili, bensì l’attuazione di strategie regionali. Ripercorrendo gli obiettivi e le tattiche di queste guerre, a cominciare dalla “Primavera araba”, Thierry Meyssan ne osserva la preparazione del prosieguo.

| Damasco (Siria)
English  Español  français  română  русский  Português  ελληνικά

A fine 2010 cominciò una serie di guerre, presentate inizialmente come sollevamenti popolari. Tunisia, Egitto, Libia, Siria e Yemen furono poi travolti dalla “Primavera araba”, riedizione della “Grande rivolta araba del 1915” iniziata da Lawrence d’Arabia, con un’unica differenza: questa volta non si trattava di appoggiarsi ai Wahhabiti, ma bensì ai Fratelli Mussulmani.

Questi accadimenti erano stati minuziosamente pianificati sin dal 2004 dal Regno Unito, come dimostrano i documenti interni del Foreign Office, rivelati dallo whistleblower [lanciatore d’allarmi] britannico Derek Pasquill [1]. Con l’eccezione del bombardamento di Tripoli (Libia) ad agosto 2011, tali eventi erano frutto non soltanto delle tecniche di destabilizzazione non violente di Gene Sharp [2], ma anche della guerra di quarta generazione di William S. Lind [3].
Messo in atto dalle forze armate USA, il progetto britannico di “Primavera araba” si sovrappose a quello dello stato-maggiore americano: la distruzione delle società e degli Stati su scala regionale, formulata dall’ammiraglio Arthur Cebrowski, resa popolare da Thomas Barnett [4] e illustrata da Ralph Peters [5].
Nel secondo trimestre 2012 la situazione sembrò calmarsi, tanto che Stati Uniti e Russia si accordarono il 30 giugno a Ginevra su una nuova ripartizione del Medio Oriente.
Ciononostante, gli Stati Uniti non onorarono la propria firma. Una seconda guerra iniziò a luglio 2012, dapprima in Siria poi in Iraq. Ai piccoli gruppi e ai commando subentrarono vasti eserciti di terra, composti da jihadisti. Non era più una guerra di quarta generazione, bensì una classica guerra di posizione, adattata alle tecniche di Abou Bakr Naji [6].
Allorché la Cina svelò le proprie ambizioni, la volontà di prevenire la riapertura della “via della seta” si sovrappose ai due antecedenti obiettivi, conformemente agli studi di Robin Wright [7].
Nell’ultimo trimestre 2017, con la caduta di Daesh, gli avvenimenti sembrarono nuovamente placarsi, ma gli investimenti nei conflitti del Medio Oriente Allargato erano stati così ingenti che era impossibile per i partigiani della guerra rinunciarvi senza aver ottenuto risultati.
Si assistette così a un tentativo di rilancio delle ostilità con la questione kurda. Dopo un primo scacco in Iraq ce ne fu un secondo in Siria. In entrambi i casi, la violenza dell’aggressione indusse Turchia, Iran, Iraq e Siria a compattarsi contro il nemico esterno.
Alla fine il Regno Unito ha deciso di perseguire l’obiettivo iniziale di egemonia attraverso i Fratelli Mussulmani e per farlo ha costituito il “Gruppo Ristretto”, rivelato da Richard Labévière [8], struttura segreta che include Arabia Saudita, Stati Uniti, Francia e Giordania.
Da parte loro, gli Stati Uniti, applicando il “Pivot verso l’Asia” di Kurt Campbell [9], hanno deciso di concentrare le proprie forze contro la Cina e hanno di nuovo formato, con Australia, India e Giappone, il Quadriennal Security Dialogue.
Frattanto, l’opinione pubblica occidentale continua a credere che il conflitto unico che ha già devastato il Medio Oriente allargato, dall’Afghanistan alla Libia, sia una successione di guerre civili per la democrazia.

[1] When Progressives Treat with Reactionaries. The British State’s flirtation with radical Islamism, Martin Bright, Policy Exchange, September 2004. “I had no choice but to leak”, Derek Pasquill, New Statesman, January 17, 2008.
[2] Making Europe Unconquerable: The Potential of Civilian-based Deterrence and Defense, Gene Sharp, Taylor & Francis, 1985.
[3] “The Changing Face of War: Into the Fourth Generation”, William S. Lind, Colonel Keith Nightengale, Captain John F. Schmitt, Colonel Joseph W. Sutton, Lieutenant Colonel Gary I. Wilson, Marine Corps Gazette, October 1989.
[4] The Pentagon’s New Map, Thomas P.M. Barnett, Putnam Publishing Group, 2004.
[5] “Blood borders – How a better Middle East would look”, Colonel Ralph Peters, Armed Forces Journal, June 2006.
[6] The Management of Savagery : The Most Critical Stage Through Which the Umma Will Pass, Abu Bakr Naji, 2005. English version translated by William McCants, Harvard University, 2006.
[7] “Imagining a Remapped Middle East”, Robin Wright, The New York Times Sunday Review, 28 septembre 2013.
[8] « Syrieleaks : un câble diplomatique britannique dévoile la “stratégie occidentale” », Richard Labévière, Observatoire géostratégique, Proche&Moyen-Orient.ch, 17 février 2018.
[9] The Pivot: The Future of American Statecraft in Asia, Kurt M. Campbell, Twelve, 2016.

Preso da: http://www.voltairenet.org/article199869.html